DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — Sights Of Spring

Spring has finally sprung in the Midwest, as Bloomington, Minn., photographer Dave Vorland’s most recent images show. But it hasn’t been like that since its start March 20, when the landscape was snow-filled and trees were bare.

DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — Montana Moments

Bloomington, Minn., photographer Dave Vorland and his daughter, Kristi, recently made a trip to Montana. Here are some of the shots Dave took from a state that boasts some magnificent sights.

DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — Paris 2017, Part II

Bloomington, Minn., photographer Dave Vorland, along with Dorette Kerian and her granddaughter, Avery Dusterhoft, recently returned to the U.S. after a visit to Paris, “the City of Lights” (“la Ville des Lumières”). Dave has been to Paris several times, so he knows his way around quite well, as is evidenced by these beautiful shots, included in the second of two galleries about the trip.

DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — Paris 2017, Part I

Bloomington, Minn., photographer Dave Vorland, along with Dorette Kerian and her granddaughter, Avery Dusterhoft, recently returned to the U.S. after a visit to Paris, “the City of Lights” (“la Ville des Lumières”). Dave has been to Paris several times, so he knows his way around quite well, as is evidenced by these beautiful shots. This is the first of two Paris galleries that will appear here.

DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — Spring Sights

Bloomington, Minn., photographer Dave Vorland captured these images in the Twin Cities the past couple of months, ranging from wildlife to landscape and celestial sights.

DAVE VORLAND: It Occurs To Me — An Inherited Interest

I inherited an interest in photography from my father.

A lifelong photo hobbyist himself, he gave me a Kodak Pony 135 camera as a birthday gift while I was still in high school. Since then I’ve shot thousands of pictures, sometimes for pay as a freelancer or as part of my job.

But mostly, it’s been a pastime, a way of getting something creative, even artistic, into my life. It’s been well worth the effort and dollars invested.

The philosopher Nietzsche once said humans are most likely to waste their time when they “get interested” in something. He got that right.

Lately, I’ve been thinking about my favorite photos, with a tentative goal of doing another book. A couple of years ago, I self-published “Paris in Monochrome,” based on a show I did at the now-closed Dakota Harvest Gallery in Grand Forks, N.D.

So what’s the deal with this particular photograph (above)?

One day in 2010, I met a young woman, Natasha Terry, who was stationed at Grand Forks Air Force Base. She had done some part-time modeling. Would I be willing to take a few pictures of her? The shoot, she said, would include a “special friend.”

It turned out to be Natasha’s pet rat.

Later, I displayed the photograph at the Dakota Harvest Gallery. Viewers responded to it enthusiastically. I even sold a few prints.

It’s one of my best pictures and will be in the new book.

If I do one.

DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — December Snapshots

Here are some of the images caught the eye of Bloomington, Minn., photographer Dave Vorland in the last month of 2016.

DAVE VORLAND: Photo Gallery — Snapshots Of The Caribbean

Dave Vorland recently returned from a trip to the Caribbean, which included stops in the island of Dominica and Puerto Rico, where he took these photographs.

DAVE VORLAND: It Occurs To Me — Street Photography

I shot the above photo in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Nov. 19, 2016. On most devices, clicking the image will provide a larger view,

It’s an example of “street” photography I’ve been drawn to since my dad bought me my first camera at age 17.

Recently, I read a definition: “Street photography features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents within public places.”

Among favorite photographers who dabbled in the genre were Robert Frank, Henri Cartier-Brisson, Diane Arbus, Gary Winogrand, Annie Liebovitz, Walker Evans, Margaret Bourke-White and Robert Doisneau.

Between my junior and senior years in college, I decided to use most of a student loan to try street photography in New York City, where I hoped to move after graduation. (Sadly, I never became a resident). I traveled to NYC alone aboard a Greyhound bus and lived in a Times Square flophouse hotel for 109 days.

I’m biased, of course, but I still think the pictures I shot then were some of my lifetime best.

Why?

Possibly because the world was still fresh to the innocent eye of a small-town kid from North Dakota.

Earlier this year I was preparing for an exhibition of New York photos I had taken over the decades. Unfortunately, the gallery that had committed to the show went belly up.

But I may have time this winter to create a book of NYC photos as I did with my Paris pictures a year or so ago. Stay tuned.

DAVE VORLAND: It Occurs To Me — Thinking Of Molli Bernstein

I was out of the country when I heard the news of Molli Bernstein’s death in Fargo on Nov. 19 at the age of 27.

When I lived in North Dakota, I photographed Molli several times, including the above shot that appeared in an exhibit of my photography at the then-Dakota Harvest Gallery in Grand Forks.

I received several offers to buy the matted and framed print, but I had reserved it for her mom, Val Bernstein, and dropped it off at her office in Fargo.

Val had assisted Molli with the clown makeup and styling, which Molli had worn on the drive to Grand Forks. I’ve often smiled at the thought of what motorists must have thought when they passed her car on Interstate 29.

Molli was a natural model who had a special inner light and quick intelligence that I admired, even telling her once that although I had an outstanding daughter myself, I still wished she was my kid.

I was especially impressed with her writing ability, samples of which her friends have seen on Facebook.

She will be laid to rest after a memorial service Monday at the Sanctuary Events Center, 670 Fourth Ave N. in Fargo. A gathering of friends and family will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. followed by a celebration of life service.

I returned to the U.S. late Saturday night with a persistent cold, so I won’t be there physically. But I certainly will be in spirit.

Bon voyage, Molli.